Bookmark Kaumudi Online  Bookmark this site  Editor@Kaumudi  |  Marketing  Print Advt rates  |  Calendar 2018        Go!    
 
 
February 20, Tuesday 2018 3:04 PM       

       HEADLINES: Youth commits suicide by jumping into backwater                                              No intention to reveal name of minister who kissed my palm: Former PRD official                                              SC to consider Priya’s plea on Wednesday                                              Plea seeking SIT probe into PNB scam likely to be mentioned before CJI bench                                              Manoj Kharat's father says 'PNB framed my son'                                              Regime forces kill 77 in Syria                                              Ashwin, Gibbs involved in Twitter spat                                              Cricket can melt ice between India and Pak: Afridi                                              ‘Out-of-favour’ Usman Qadir plan to represent Australia in 2020 World T20                                              Kaumudi Facebook
       SCI&TECH Next Article: Theweightmonitor.com launches mobile app for easier access to one-stop weight management platform  
       Orbiting supermassive black holes discovered for first time
 
         Posted on :20:45:27 Jun 28, 2017
   
A A
       Last edited on:20:45:27 Jun 28, 2017
         Tags: Orbiting supermassive black holes discovered
 
NEW YORK: In a major breakthrough, astronomers including one of Indian origin have discovered two supermassive black holes orbiting each other 750 million light years away from Earth - a finding that may help better understand how gravitational waves are formed.
 
Last year, an international team of researchers detected the existence of gravitational waves, confirming German physicist Albert Einstein's 100-year-old prediction and astonishing the scientific community.
 
These gravitational waves were the result two stellar mass black holes of about 30 solar masses colliding in space.
 
Scientists will now be able to start to understand what leads up to the merger of supermassive black holes that creates ripples in the fabric of space-time and begin to learn more about the evolution of galaxies and the role these black holes play in it.
 
"For a long time, we've been looking into space to try and find a pair of these supermassive black holes orbiting as a result of two galaxies merging," said Professor Greg Taylor from University of New Mexico in the US.
 
"Even though we've theorised that this should be happening, nobody had ever seen it until now," said Taylor.
 
Researchers have been studying the interaction between these black holes for 12 years.
"When Dr Taylor gave me this data I was at the very beginning of learning how to image and understand it," said Karishma Bansal, first-author of the study published in The Astrophysical Journal.
 
"As I learned there was data going back to 2003, we plotted it and determined they are orbiting one another. It's very exciting," said Bansal.
 
Using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a system made up of 10 radio telescopes across the US, researchers have been able to observe several frequencies of radio signals emitted by these supermassive black holes (SMBH).
 
Over time, astronomers have essentially been able to plot their trajectory and confirm that these black holes are in orbit with one another.
 
At roughly 750 million light years from Earth, the galaxy named 0402+379 and the supermassive black holes within it, are incredibly far away, but are also at the perfect distance from Earth and each other to be observed.
 
Bansal said these supermassive black holes have a combined mass of 15 billion times that of our Sun, or 15 billion solar masses.
 
The unbelievable size of these black holes means their orbital period is around 24,000 years, so while the team has been observing them for over a decade, they have yet to see even the slightest curvature in their orbit.
 
Continuing to observe the orbit and interaction of these two supermassive black holes could also help us gain a better understanding of what the future of our own galaxy might look like.
 
Right now, the Andromeda galaxy, which also has a SMBH at its centre, is on a path to collide with our Milky Way. The event that the researchers are studying may occur in our galaxy in a few billion years.
A A
       SCI&TECH
Next Article: Theweightmonitor.com launches mobile app for easier access to one-stop weight management platform
 
 
SCI&TECH HEADLINES
Ensuring sexual, reproductive health for overall well-being  
WeChat gets popular in Bhutan: report  
Celebrate love this Valentine's Day with Google Pixel 2  
This drug could reverse alcohol's damaging effects on brain  
Scientists discover enormous reserves of mercury in permafrost  
Google Assistant helps you set music alarms  
What is epilepsy?  
Here're some ways to keep dementia at bay  
What are memories made of?  
Second-hand plastic toys could harm your kid  
Working before and after stroke is good for brain health  
ixigo introduces India's first augmented reality feature for Train Passengers  
Super blue moon on Jan. 31 will mark last of trilogy  
Now, a blood test that can screen eight cancer types  
Secret of longevity protein revealed!  
Absence of this gene can give men deadly cancer  
Soon, you can demote group admins on WhatsApp  
Regular yoga can slow down ageing of brain: Study  
What are haemorrhoids (piles) and what causes them?  
WhatsApp facilitates quick switch from voice to video call  
The Thin and Light Lenovo Ideapad 720s shines at Digit Zero 1 Awards  
Frequent heartburns up cancer risk in older adults  
Blueberry vinegar can help fight dementia  
iPhones with older batteries will take a hit in performance: Apple  
Eighth planet found in faraway solar system, matching ours  
 
Do you think the arrested persons in Shuhaib murder case are real culprits?
yes
 
no
 
no opinion
 
 
 
Home Kerala India World Business Sports Sci&Tech Education Automobile CityNews Movies Environment Letters 
© Copyright keralakaumudi Online 2011  |  Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.
Head Office Address: Kaumudi Buildings, Pettah P.O, Trivandrum - 695024, India.
Online queries talk to Deepu Sasidharan, + 91 98472 38959 or Email deepu[at]kaumudi.com
Customer Service -Advertisement Disclaimer Statement   |  Copyright Policy