Bookmark Kaumudi Online  Bookmark this site  Editor@Kaumudi  |  Marketing  Print Advt rates  |  Calendar 2012        Go!    
 
 
September 26, Tuesday 2017 12:09 AM       

       HEADLINES: Court to consider Kavya’s anticipatory bail plea later today                                              Lake encroachment: Chennithala demands prosecution of Thomas Chandy                                              Case against Jayarajan to close: Report submitted to vigilance director                                              Vallathol Award for Prabha Varma                                              No need of anticipatory bail for Kavya Madhavan: HC                                              Rajiv Mehrishi takes oath as CAG of India                                              Amit Shah slams Rahul for defending dynastic politics                                              Ram Rahim moves Punjab & Haryana HC challenging CBI court's rape case verdict                                              Merkel wins fourth term, hard right gains foothold in parliament                                              Former world’s ‘heaviest’ woman Eman Ahmed passes away                                              Afghan security forces kill 15 Taliban insurgents in Logar province                                              US expands travel ban, adds N Korea, Chad to the list                                              Sports Ministry recommends P V Sindhu for Padma Bhushan                                              I have been hitting sixes since childhood: Pandya                                              Bumrah, Bhuvi are best death bowlers around: Smith                                              Kaumudi Facebook
       SCI&TECH Next Article: Indian-American teen wins top science award worth USD 250,000  
       First patient cured of rare blood disorder'
 
         Posted on :22:01:59 Mar 21, 2017
   
A A
       Last edited on:22:01:59 Mar 21, 2017
         Tags: First patient cured of rare blood disorder'
 
WASHINGTON: In a first, doctors in the US claim to have successfully cured an adult patient with a rare blood disorder in which the body does not produce enough red blood cells, causing progressive organ damage and early death. Physicians employed a technique that avoids the use of high-dose chemotherapy and radiation in preparation for a stem cell transplant to cure the patient with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA).
 
The transplant technique is unique, because it allows a donor's cells to gradually take over a patient's bone marrow without using toxic agents to eliminate a patient's cells prior to the transplant, researchers said. Damiano Rondelli, Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago in US, said the protocol can be used even in patients with a long history of disease and some organ damage because of the minimal use of chemotherapy.
 
"For many adult patients with a blood disorder, treatment options have been limited because they are often not sick enough to qualify for a risky procedure, or they are too sick to tolerate the toxic drugs used alongside a standard transplant," said Rondelli. "This procedure gives some adults the option of a stem cell transplant which was not previously available," Rondelli said.
 
For more than 30 years, David Levy's only course of treatment for CDA was regular blood transfusions to ensure his organs and tissues received enough oxygen. Levy, from Northbrook, Illinois, was 24 when the pain became so severe he had to withdraw from graduate school. By age 32, Levy required transfusions every two to three weeks; had lost his spleen; had an enlarged liver; and was suffering severely from fatigue, heart palpitations and iron poisoning, a side effect of regular blood transfusions.
 
Rondelli said that because of Levy's range of illnesses and inability to tolerate chemotherapy and radiation, several institutions had denied him the possibility of a stem cell transplant. Rondelli performed Levy's transplant in 2014. "The transplant was hard, and I had some complications, but I am back to normal now," said Levy, now 35. "I still have some pain and some lingering issues from the years my condition was not properly managed, but I can be independent now. That is the most important thing to me," he said.
 
Rondelli said the potential of this approach to stem cell transplantation is very promising. "The use of this transplant protocol may represent a safe therapeutic strategy to treat adult patients with many types of congenital anemias - perhaps the only possible cure," Rondelli added. The case report was published in the journal Bone Marrow Transplantation. In a first, doctors in the US claim to have successfully cured an adult patient with a rare blood disorder in which the body does not produce enough red blood cells, causing progressive organ damage and early death. Physicians employed a technique that avoids the use of high-dose chemotherapy and radiation in preparation for a stem cell transplant to cure the patient with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA).
 
The transplant technique is unique, because it allows a donor's cells to gradually take over a patient's bone marrow without using toxic agents to eliminate a patient's cells prior to the transplant, researchers said. Damiano Rondelli, Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago in US, said the protocol can be used even in patients with a long history of disease and some organ damage because of the minimal use of chemotherapy.
 
"For many adult patients with a blood disorder, treatment options have been limited because they are often not sick enough to qualify for a risky procedure, or they are too sick to tolerate the toxic drugs used alongside a standard transplant," said Rondelli. "This procedure gives some adults the option of a stem cell transplant which was not previously available," Rondelli said.
 
For more than 30 years, David Levy's only course of treatment for CDA was regular blood transfusions to ensure his organs and tissues received enough oxygen. Levy, from Northbrook, Illinois, was 24 when the pain became so severe he had to withdraw from graduate school. By age 32, Levy required transfusions every two to three weeks; had lost his spleen; had an enlarged liver; and was suffering severely from fatigue, heart palpitations and iron poisoning, a side effect of regular blood transfusions.
 
Rondelli said that because of Levy's range of illnesses and inability to tolerate chemotherapy and radiation, several institutions had denied him the possibility of a stem cell transplant. Rondelli performed Levy's transplant in 2014. "The transplant was hard, and I had some complications, but I am back to normal now," said Levy, now 35. "I still have some pain and some lingering issues from the years my condition was not properly managed, but I can be independent now. That is the most important thing to me," he said.
 
Rondelli said the potential of this approach to stem cell transplantation is very promising. "The use of this transplant protocol may represent a safe therapeutic strategy to treat adult patients with many types of congenital anemias - perhaps the only possible cure," Rondelli added. The case report was published in the journal Bone Marrow Transplantation. 
A A
       SCI&TECH
Next Article: Indian-American teen wins top science award worth USD 250,000
 
 
SCI&TECH HEADLINES
Astrophysicists make music from Saturn's moons, rings  
Rooter includes Kabbadi, F1 under one roof  
Orbiting supermassive black holes discovered for first time  
Theweightmonitor.com launches mobile app for easier access to one-stop weight management platform  
New drug to treat blood cancer developed  
Threat of asteroid impact looming over Earth: experts  
Hottest known planet in universe discovered  
Wireless, battery-less pacemaker developed  
'Manned missions to Moon, Mars may face medical emergencies'  
Ransomware threat: Centre activates mechanism to prevent ‘Wannacry’ cyber attack  
2 lakh hit by 'unprecedented' cyberhack in 150 nations:Europol  
foodpanda revamps mobile app; provides more options  
ixigo launches trains app for Apple iOS users  
Virtual humans may help doctors learn empathy: study  
Gamers, here are five games to watch out for  
Yahoo India homepage gets brand new look  
Spacecraft flies between Saturn and rings in historic 1st  
Google targets 'fake news,' offensive search suggestions  
Offensive WhatsApp posts can land group admin in jail  
Facebook for 'everyone' and not just high end: Zuckerberg  
Google Earth re-invented for new era  
NASA images show how India looks from space at night  
Signs of life detected below world's deepest point  
'iPhones assembly in Bengaluru by Apple in less than a month'  
Five astronauts assigned to future ISS mission: NASA  
 
Do you think protest against 'Ramaleela' is justified?
Yes
 
No
 
No Opinion
 
 
 
Home Kerala India World Business Sports Sci&Tech Education Automobile CityNews Movies Environment Letters 
© Copyright keralakaumudi Online 2011  |  Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.
Head Office Address: Kaumudi Buildings, Pettah P.O, Trivandrum - 695024, India.
Online queries talk to Deepu Sasidharan, + 91 98472 38959 or Email deepu[at]kaumudi.com
Customer Service -Advertisement Disclaimer Statement   |  Copyright Policy